Dunbar Assembly Rooms plans are given group’s backing

2 weeks ago | 9 Views
/storage/POST/0/Image/c1c0a8bb-b58a-4e5f-b617-6c67c431f63e.png

Attempts to transform the Dunbar Assembly Rooms have rumbled on for nearly 30 years – with the building deemed at risk for more than two decades.


In March, Fiona McMiken submitted plans to East Lothian Council looking to transform the upper floors of the building into a single home. Jacquie Bell, secretary of the community council, wrote a letter to East Lothian Council’s planning department on behalf of the community council, describing the redevelopment of the Assembly Rooms as “a complicated matter”.


Last year, both East Lothian Council and Scottish Ministers rejected plans to turn the building into four flats. That came amid concerns surrounding parking and alterations to the roof of the building, which was last in use as a furniture shop in the late 1970s.


Those proposals, from Alexander Williamson, marked the last stop on a lengthy journey to try to secure planning permission at the site. The building was then sold and Mrs McMiken now hopes to turn it into a family home.


Mrs Bell said: “East Lothian Council planning guidance has sought the conservation and restoration of the upper levels.


“An all-site solution might have been desirable but not easy to put into practice due to the multi-ownership of the lower storey and garden ground.


“Consequently, it has continued to deteriorate and has been at increasing risk of future demolition should a solution not be found.


“The new application would seem to be an appropriate one to enable the building to be saved.”

Drawings included with the latest application show the property split over three levels, including a roof terrace.


On the ground floor, which is above existing basement flats, would be an en-suite guest bedroom, living room and dining area, alongside a snug. Upstairs would be the master bedroom, with walk-in wardrobe, and two other bedrooms, as well as two offices.


Source: East Lothian Courier

News History